Remote Debugging Chrome on Android with Windows

I’m an IPhone user. I like the device. I’m not a fanboy. I’m curious. So I got myself an HUAWEI P smart with Android Oreo (Version 8).1. Lets set up developer mode by following the android studio guide…Open the Settings appSelect System (only on Android 8.0 or higher) Scroll to the bottom and select “About phone”Scroll to the bottom and tap “Build number” 7 times–Whaaaaat? Tap? Seven times? Really 7?Return to the previous screen to find “Developer options” near the bottom2. Connect to the PhoneDownload the Android SDK Platform-ToolsExtract the filesConnect the phone using USB cableRun the Android Device Bridge (ADB) on the computer “adb devices”Enable USB debugging on the device settings and authorize the computerRun “adb devices” againRun “& ./adb forward tcp:9222 localabstract:chrome_devtools_remote”3. Connect Chrome to the deviceOpen ChromeHit [F12] to open the DevToolsClick Settings | More Tools | Remote devices4. Start DebuggingClick on the device you connected in the DevTools remove devices windowOpen a new tab or select an existing oneClick Inspect to open the remote inspection windowHTH

W3C Server Timing Header and API

I used custom headers in the past to send some metrics over to the client–mostly for debugging purposes to quickly differentiate between client and server issues on slow web request and/or web application performance.While that was working out pretty well I like standards and even if I did not tell anybody I always wanted such a thing built into HTTP.A W3C standard is on the way: Server TimingIt consists of a spec how the HTTP Header is constructed: And a client side API for JavaScript: Of course not all browsers support it yetBut Chrome 65–at the time of writing in the beta channel–does so:Even without any extra JavaScript you can inspect the numbers sent with the header in the Network tab of the DevTools:

Builds with conditional NuGet publishing in Team Foundation Server

For a nightly build it makes no sense to publish a NuGet package as no code changed and therefore the same GitVersion is calculated.Since version 2017 Update 3 the on premise version of Microsoft's Team Foundation Server supports "Custom Conditions" on "Build Tasks" – but sadly not on "Task Groups".Here is what you need to exclude a step from a scheduled build: Here a screenshot of the condition in action:HTH

Data Lake WTF

After an Update of Visual Studio 2015 (14) I wanted to use my usual keyboard short cut ([ALT] + [D]) to expand the “Debug”-menu and … Two menu entries listening to [D] now? For this ridiculous amount of 4 (in words four) menu entries? Seriously? Just delete the folder. And voila: Back. Productive. Done. Dear Microsoft, please stop that kind of *marketing* making developers every day life harder. I know you can do much better! HTH,Daniel

Junctions with PowerShell

Junctions are really useful. It pretty easy to create them inside a command shell on windows: But as it is a command inside cmd.exe and not a executable you cannot use mklink from PowerShell without calling cmd.exe BUT: the New-Item cmdlet supports options to achieve the same since Windows Management Framework v.5.